Category Archives: Managing Accessibility

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Automated Lies, with one line of code

In 1998, Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act came out, as did the first version of WCAG. In the time period of 1998-2000, a number of new companies were created around Web Accessibility. Major players in the US like Deque, The Paciello Group, and Bartimeus Group (later acquired by/ merged with SSB Technologies, becoming SSB …

Management: Avoid making this costly accessibility mistake

In a few months, I begin my 15th year doing accessibility work and my first year 100% self-employed. As I reflect on the path that brought me here, I’m reminded of so many people who work at accessibility consulting firms that had similar experiences. In 2003-2004 I worked as E-Commerce Manager for NASA Federal Credit …

Website Accessibility in the United States: What are your requirements under the ADA?

“Compliance” is a word I’m not a fan of. The reasons are many, but the most important reason is that it puts people into the mindset of “What am I required to do?” vs. “What should I do?” – and the latter mindset is the true path to risk mitigation. When it comes to the …

Automated Web Accessibility Testing Tools Are Not Judges

Recently social media has been abuzz regarding an article titled “ITIF: 92% of Top Federal Websites Fail to Meet Security, Speed, Accessibility Standards” – and for good reason. The article cites a study by ITIF which details rampant failings of websites of the US Government. American taxpayers, being both the audience and source of funding …

Accessibility Business Case: Spending your money intelligently

Frequent readers know I write a lot about the business case for accessibility. In fact, 5 years ago I published a series of posts called Chasing the accessibility business case. The first post in the series outlined the core considerations for building a business case. In general, the value of an effective business case should …

Some tough love: Stop the excuses, already.

Over a year ago, Dale Cruse called me “militant” about accessibility. I know I use strong language at times, but I actively try to have a softer touch. I think he meant it kindly anyway, but I worried a little. “Do I come off too strong?” I wondered. I get a lot of compliments on …