Category Archives: Agile Accessibility

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Website Accessibility in the United States: What are your requirements under the ADA?

“Compliance” is a word I’m not a fan of. The reasons are many, but the most important reason is that it puts people into the mindset of “What am I required to do?” vs. “What should I do?” – and the latter mindset is the true path to risk mitigation. When it comes to the …

Extreme Accessibility, Revisited

I’m really terrible about responding to emails. I get (and send) a lot of email and lots of it just sits and sits for embarrassingly long times. After CSUN I got a great email with some questions from Vincent François about some of the things I said during my CSUN 2016 presentation “Extreme Accessibility” Vincent …

Accessibility Consulting is Broken

I’ve had an epiphany. Accessibility Consulting, that process where a client hires us to go through their system, test it for accessibility issues, and submit a report to them, is fundamentally broken. My personal interpretation of our goal, as professionals, is to make money doing Good. Our advanced level of knowledge, skills, and experience can …

Everything you know about accessibility is wrong (Part 3)

In the previous post in this series, I ended with a discussion that “current automatic accessibility testing practices take place at the wrong place and wrong time and is done by the wrong people” but really this applies to all accessibility testing. Of course every organization is different, but my experience substantiates the statement quite …

Everything you know about accessibility testing is wrong (part 2)

In Everything you know about accessibility testing is wrong (part 1) I left off talking about automated accessibility testing tools. It is my feeling that a tool of any kind absolutely must deliver on its promise to make the user more effective at the task they need the tool to perform. As a woodworker, I …

Everything you know about accessibility testing is wrong (part 1)

My first experience with accessibility and, therefore, accessibility testing, came from Bobby. In 1995, CAST launched Bobby as a free public service to make the burgeoning World Wide Web more accessible to individuals with disabilities. Over the next decade, Bobby helped novice and professional Web designers analyze and make improvements to millions of Web pages. …